Daily Infliction

Written by: editor Dec,08 2014 14:15 PM
Staring at a computer monitor for hours has become an inevitable part of the modern workday, but little do we take into seriousness the strain it puts on our eyes. Red on to understand how our vision is affected, and means to relieve the symptoms. 





 
 
The name for eye problems caused by computer usage is called computer vision syndrome (CVS). CVS describes a group of eye and vision related problems that result from prolonged computer use. Research has shown that CVS is a common problem. Between 50% and 90% of people who work at computer screen have at least some symptom of CVS.
In addition, working adults aren’t the only ones vulnerable to CVS. Kids who spend the whole day playing computer games may also experience eye problem due to computer use, especially if the lighting and computer position are less ideal.  
 

 Staring at a computer monitor for hours has become an inevitable part of the modern workday, but little do we take into seriousness the strain it puts on our eyes. Red on to understand how our vision is affected, and means to relieve the symptoms. 



 
 
The name for eye problems caused by computer usage is called computer vision syndrome (CVS). CVS describes a group of eye and vision related problems that result from prolonged computer use. Research has shown that CVS is a common problem. Between 50% and 90% of people who work at computer screen have at least some symptom of CVS.
In addition, working adults aren’t the only ones vulnerable to CVS. Kids who spend the whole day playing computer games may also experience eye problem due to computer use, especially if the lighting and computer position are less ideal.  
 
How Does The Computer Screen Affect Your Vision?
So how can the computer screen affect vision? Computer vision syndrome is a type of repetitive stress injury, it occurs when you’re doing the same motion over and over again. The symptoms worsen the longer you continue the activity.
Working at a computer requires the eyes to continuously focus, move back and forth to track, and align with what you are seeing. You may look down at a document and then look up to type again; the eyes will have to keep changing focus in order to create a clear image for the brain to interpret.
All this change in focusing requires a lot of effort from the eye muscles. Furthermore, a computer screen also adds the element of screen contrast, flicker and glare, which requires more focusing effort from the eye, when compared to reading a book. CVS is more likely to occur if you have an eye problem such as shortsightedness, longsightedness, or astigmatism, and do not wear the correct prescription glasses. Aging changes of the eye such as presbyopia can also contribute to the development of visual symptoms.


What Are The Symptoms of Computer Vision Syndrome?
Usually the visual symptoms experienced by computer users are only temporary and will decline after stopping computer work. However, some individuals may experience continued reduced visual abilities, such as blurred distance vision, even after stopping work at a computer. If nothing is done to address the cause of the problem, the symptoms will continue to recur and may worsen over time. 


 


What Can You Do To Relieve The Symptoms?
 
By making a few simple changes in your work environment, you can help to prevent and improve computer vision symptoms:
 
  • Reduce the glare.  Change the lighting around you to reduce the glare on the computer screen. Use shades on a window to block off the glare if the monitor is set beside a window.
  • Rearrange your desk. Researchers found that the optimal position for computer screen is 15 to 20 degree below eye level, about 50 to 70 cm away. Place a holder beside the screen to hold your printed material, the goal is for you to not move your head too much when viewing both material. 
 
  • Seating position. Chairs should be comfortably padded and conform to your body. Chair height should be adjusted so that your feet rest flat on the floor. Use the arms on the chair to provide arm support while typing. Your wrist shouldn’t rest on the keyboard while typing.
  • Rest your eyes. Take a break by looking away from the screen, and gaze out the window every 20 minutes for 20 seconds. Blink often to keep the eye moist. The blinking frequency tends to reduce to about 3-4 times per minute when the eyes are concentrating on a task. Normal blinking rate is about 10 times per minute.
  • Tweak your computer screen setting. Adjust the brightness, contrast, and font size until you find the most comfortable settings for your vision



Visit your eye care practitioner yearly for and eye examination to make sure that the prescription is accurate. The eye care practitioner will help to evaluate and maybe recommend some special type of spectacle lenses to reduce your symptoms. 


 

 
 


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